sciarra: (Default)
[personal profile] sciarra
The students are back from fall break today. I am so GLAD! Campus was deathly quiet and kind of spooky without them. It didn't help that it rained non-stop and I was required to be here when all of the faculty and most of the professional staff (that's what I am) were not.

I really enjoyed teaching my class today. In fact, this is strange to admit, I have had more fun teaching this class than any of the English classes I have taught lately. I need to spend some time thinking about why that is. I don't know if it's the ego-stroking I'm receiving (the students are having fun as most [not all] of the math teachers here are rather dry) or if it goes deeper than that. The irony is that to really teach math at a the CC level, I'd have to take some graduate course in it. And I'm not sure I'm good enough at math for anything more than grad education classes in it.

Anyway, that's today's up in the air moment. The sun is out, the leaves are changing, the students are back, and I'm feeling cheerier.

(no subject)

19/10/09 18:34 (UTC)
seryn: flowers (Default)
Posted by [personal profile] seryn
I'm glad things are looking up, at least temporarily.

Days when I'm being singled out for some lameness, I usually make cocoa. It works better for me than L'Oreal in terms of making me feel like I'm worth more than the dreck around me. You should find something that helps you. I'm a big proponent of invisible armor against the woes of the world.

Do you take vitamins? You should probably look into it if not. There was some hoopla last winter about raising the RDA for vitamin D but the controversy was that most American adults are already deficient even by the old standards. We are, apparently, much more solar-powered than anyone suspected. I take a regular multi-vitamin and a chewable calcium daily now. It doesn't completely solve the wibbliness when things are going badly, but combined with the invisible psychic armor, I do a lot better at not undermining myself.

I think you could probably find grad-level maths that suited your career path, but you would have to be choosy. Good luck with that.

(no subject)

19/10/09 20:35 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] arielprocessing.livejournal.com
have you considered teaching developmental English classes?

glad you're enjoying the work!

(no subject)

20/10/09 01:10 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] thera-flu.livejournal.com
It's funny, but I'd rather teach dev. math courses. I've read some of my students' essay, and wow, just wow. I think I'm not possessive of math the way I am of lit., if that makes any sense.

(no subject)

19/10/09 23:20 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] jaydeyn-sitari.livejournal.com

That's very cool! :D And have you thought about auditing the grad courses? You might be better at this maths stuff than you think!

:)
Jaydeyn

(no subject)

20/10/09 01:11 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] thera-flu.livejournal.com
I had a similar thought after posting. My undergrad was really tough, and I should remember that 99% of schools are not that hard. I am by no means a great mathematician, but I might be good enough to get by at a regular school.

(no subject)

20/10/09 00:48 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] zeza3.livejournal.com
Hooray for cheer!

(no subject)

22/10/09 17:50 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] coachjg.livejournal.com
This makes me wonder: what is it about the English courses you've taught lately that was so unsatisfying, and what was it about this course that was so different.

(no subject)

23/10/09 13:47 (UTC)
Posted by [identity profile] thera-flu.livejournal.com
Great question.

Here's part of it: students walk into math often feeling like the math is hard, and they're bad it. If you can help them see that it's not so hard, and that logical thinking goes a long way, they're really grateful. In the last Shakespeare class I TAed, some of the students were amazing, but there was the familiar attitude that English somehow shouldn't be hard. They resented Shakespeare for writing the way he did. I think I sometimes get tired of convincing them that English is also worth working hard at. Does that make any sense?